Thursday, April 26, 2012

For Mary's Sake, Let Rome Decide

Medjugorje has been a balm for some Catholics as well as a cause for divisiveness and it continues with renewed fervor even after thirty years. There is again, a new surge in accusations being flung all over the internet that some stateside Catholic writers and/or bloggers of note are anti-Medjugorje as well as accusations that the faithful who do believe in these apparitions are blindly following a supernatural event that may or may not be true.

It would be unusual if these apparitions of Our Lady were not true while reports of miracles of  physical and spiritual healings continue to come from Medjugorje. Given what we know of Lourdes and Fatima, it would be equally unusual if Our Blessed Mother has publicly communicated with these seers for thirty years! This does not sound like Mary's M.O. but who am I to say she can't or wouldn't choose to do so. If these events had occurred in private all along it would be one thing, but since they occurred while the public surged around the seers during these apparitions almost from the get go, I would be a liar if I said I had no questions concerning their veracity. Everything about Medjugorje is unusual, but then again we do live in unusual times.

Lourdes and Fatima did not have the benefit, if indeed it is a benefit, of having the mass media we have today with the internet and cable T.V. Unlike Medjugorje, Lourdes and Fatima were localized events that took months if not years to be communicated to the Catholic world, and once it happened, the true story was being reported. Not so with Medjugorje. Almost immediately, stories began to leak out to Catholics around the world that something was happening in this little village before all facts were known giving way to less than accurate dissemination of information.

There are too many unanswered questions about Medjugorje. I would love for the apparitions to be true, as I believe in the events of Lourdes and Fatima to be true, but my faith does not rest on apparitions of our Blessed Mother, but on God through his Church. If people come away from Medjugorje with renewed faith, healings of mind and body and a return to the Church, that would be a  good thing. If some come back skeptical, that alone does not make anyone a bad Catholic, but a discerning one who is being protective of  his/her soul until doubts of Medjugorje are resolved one way or another.

I have a two thousand year old suggestion to make:  With Gamaliel, let those of both sides of the Medjugorje issue say, Acts 5 ---38 “So in the present case, I say to you, stay away from these men and let them alone, for if this plan or action is of men, it will be overthrown; 39 but if it is of God, you will not be able to overthrow them; or else you may even be found fighting against God.”

Let Rome decide.

7 comments:

  1. Ben, My real concern is that Medjugorje is causing a lot of ill feelings between Catholics! This is not how we should be living our lives in the faith. I understand how people can get caught up in something like this and by many accounts will actually turn their lives around and go back to God and his Church. If only we could wait for Rome to speak and settle things then a lot of animosity could be avoided.

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  2. So much of what I've heard about Medjugore (rosaries turning color, the holiest woman in the village being a mahometan, Our Lady's favorite song being the Battle Hymn of the Republic, and on and on) sound, at best, weird.

    I've also heard that the local bishop has not approved of these visions.

    But also, all of this I've heard about 5th or 6th hand; I can say the same thing about Fatima, too.

    So, I agree. NONE of us have to have an opinion until those appointed by the Holy See investigate this thoroughly and then report.

    Some rad-trads doubt the authenticity of the Medjugore events because none of the visionaries entered the religious life. But what doctrine or canon law of the Church says they had too? St. Juan Diego never did, either, as far as I know.

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  3. Jack,
    There is nothing wrong in having an opinion on something, but when there is no way for someone to know for sure whether something is true or not until the verdict is in, then opinions should not be used as a way of maligning people, especially in this case and as Christians. Those that accuse others in the media of ignoring Medj. or of being anti-Medj. should also refrain from calling the accused unfaithful:that is not Christian charity. Calling a believer in Medjugorje a whack job is also uncharitable, especially since some of those that have visited the site have always be steadfast in their faith and Church and far from being flighty. Something has been happening in Medjugorje that is good as well as questionable. Let's wait for Rome.

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  4. Jack, St Juan Diego is classified in the martyrology as a hermit, which is a class of the consecrated life. He did not marry but lived by himself adjacent to the church built to honor Our Lady. The choice of the consecrated life is consistent with an experience of the love of God that calls the person to the desire to return that love singleheartedly.

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  5. Fatima was decided right away. Our Lady of the Rosary announced at Fatima, that it was God's wish that the Pope establish devotion to the Immaculate Heart of Mary throughout the world. She promised to save the world by this means.

    None of the Popes since 1917 have granted God's wish. Modernism and ecumenism have neutralized the Catholic Hierarchy. A yea or any vote on Medjugorje is a non event.

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  6. Elizabeth D, St. Juan Diego WAS married, but was a widower at the time of his vision.

    Of course, the ultimate test of any vision is what fruit it bears. That is seen clearly in Lourdes and Guadalupe. It took a while for Fatima. And we're still waiting for Medjugure.

    \\None of the Popes since 1917 have granted God's wish.\\ Sue, that's NOT what Sr. Lucia said before she died.

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